After reviewing this page and watching the video contact your Advisor before submitting Form 3.4!

Setting Your Goals!

At this point, you’ve chosen a communications platform and developed strategies to effectively communicate your messages to your audience! The next step is to write an effective goal statement for your project.

An Effective Goal for your Climate Solutions Project should:

  • Be well defined
  • Be measurable and include the amount of greenhouse gas your project aims to reduce or prevent (if applicable)
  • Be time bound with a set starting and ending date
  • List specific actions taken to ensure success 

Generic vs. Effective Goals

Here are two examples of goal statements. The first is generic and unlikely to result in success, while the second contains all the components of an effective goal and is much more likely to result in a successful project: 

  • Generic: We want to reduce CO2 generated from idling cars. 
  • Effective: We want to reduce 1.5 tons of carbon dioxide emissions (measurable amount of greenhouse gas) from idling cars in the drive-through line at the fast-food restaurant on the corner of Pine and 1st (well defined) by conducting a Public Education and Action Campaign targeting customers (specific action) every Friday afternoon during the month of April (time bound).

Let’s take a break to recap what Greenhouse Gasses are and how they impact the Earth!

Greenhouse Gas Target:

All teams will have project goals that they aim to achieve! However, depending on your project, your goal may or may not also include a Greenhouse Gas Target. If your project aims to reduce/prevent something that can be directly translated to a measurable amount of greenhouse gas, your effective goal statement will include a Greenhouse Gas Target. However, if your project has an outreach focused goal, you may not be able to translate your impact into a measurable greenhouse gas target.

Effective Goal with Greenhouse Gas Target

For example, if your project focuses on reducing the number of cars that idle in a drive-through, you are able to calculate how much carbon dioxide (greenhouse gas) your project will aim to reduce.

Effective Goal: We want to reduce 1.5 tons of carbon dioxide emissions (measurable greenhouse gas target) from idling cars in the drive-through line at the fast-food restaurant on the corner of Pine and 1st (well defined) by conducting a Public Education and Action Campaign targeting customers (specific action) every Friday afternoon during the month of April (time bound).

Effective Goal without Greenhouse Gas Target

NOT all projects will have an easily definable amount of greenhouse gas that is saved or prevented. For example, if your project focuses on educating your school community on the impacts of single use plastics on the climate, it would be very difficult to accurately measure the exact impact that your project had on the habits of the people you reached. So, you would not need to report a measurable greenhouse gas reduction/prevention.

Effective Goal: We want to educate 75% of our school community (measurable) on the harms of single-use plastics and how to avoid them (well defined) by conducting a Public Education and Action Campaign by holding three Zoom webinars in the month of March (time bound), that teach the students how avoid and upcycle plastic (specific action).

Contact your Advisor prior to submitting this form to go over your Effective Goal Statement and get guidance on if it should include a Greenhouse Gas Target.



Reminder that May 15th is the last day to submit any Campaign Materials on our website or to your Advisor!



Having trouble viewing or completing the form below? To view in Google Forms click here – Phase 3.4 Form

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Click Here: Move on to the next step: Phase 3.5 – Master Task List

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